Nan Panjereh – Persian Rosettes

4.96 from 23 votes
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Nan Panjereh, also known as Persian rosettes is a traditional Persian cookie that is crisp and light. Once you learn the technique, it is easy and fun to make! 

powdered sugar being dusted on Persian rosettes.


 

Every year we celebrate Nowruz (Persian New Year) around March 20th. Our Nowruz menu includes many dishes including sweets and cookies. Persian cookies are lightly aromatic and just sweet enough to make you happy. Some popular Persian sweets are pofaki gerdooyi (walnut cookies), raisin cookies, shirini nargili (coconut cookies), and cardamom cookies. Today I’m going to introduce another delicious Persian delicacy called Persian rosettes . 

What Are Rosettes?

Rosettes, or as they’re called in Farsi, Nan Panjereh are crispy and light cookies that are deep fried in cooking oil and topped with powdered sugar.

The Origin of Rosettes

Rosettes are from all over the world. I’ve had people from Norway, Sweden, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and Indonesia messaging me and telling me that their grandma used to make these cookies when they were kids! I assume that rosettes are a staple for Christmas and new year in many countries and cultures.  

My grandma used to make Nan Panjereh – Persian Rosette Cookies around this time of the year and almost everyday during Nowruz. Since my grandma passed away, my maman has been making these beauties every year.

What Does Nan Panjereh Mean?

“Nan” means bread or cookie and “Panjereh” means “window” and I think this cookie is named Nan Panjereh because the shape of the cookie looks like old Iranian windows. Since rosettes are made with special rosette iron, you can make these crispy cookies in different shapes. 

nan panjereh broken in half.

Ingredients and substitutions

  • Wheat starch: Traditionally, these cookies are made with wheat starch, however, cornstarch would work as well.
  • Rose water: Just a little bit of rosewater adds a nice aroma to the cookies. If you’re not a fan of rosewater, use regular water instead.
  • Eggs: It’s best to use eggs that are at room temperature.
  • All purpose flour: You need about 1/3 cup all purpose flour to bring the batter together.

How To Make Nan Panjereh

  1. First of all, you need rosette irons which you can find online (affiliate link). Start by mixing the starch in some rosewater or water to form a paste.
  2. Next, add the eggs and flour and mix well until you have a smooth batter. Let the batter sit for 30 minutes and then heat some oil in a sauce pan or a deep frying pan over medium high heat. The oil should be hot enough that bubbles appear around a toothpick touching the bottom of the pan. 
  3. Heat the rosette iron in the oil for 15 seconds, lift the iron and shake off the excess oil and immediately dip it into the batter, making sure to only dip it enough so the edge of the iron is even with the surface. Then dip the iron in the hot oil and let the rosette puff and separates from the iron. Fry each side of the rosette for 20-30 seconds until golden.
  4. Take the fried rosette out of the oil and place it on a paper towel to absorb extra oil. Once they’re cool completely, dust them with powdered sugar. 

The Secret To The Perfect Rosette

The most important tip for making Nan Panjereh – Persian Rosettes is to let the rosette iron get hot in oil before dipping it in the batter. When you dip the iron rosette in the batter, the top edge of the iron is even with the surface of the batter (you can see it in the video). The first couple of Persian Rosettes may not turn out perfect but don’t worry, because they’ll keep getting better.

Storage

You can store these Persian rosettes in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days. I don’t recommend freezing them since the texture would not be the same after thawing.

Persian rosettes topped with powdered sugar.

Frequently asked questions

Why do my rosettes get soggy? 

There could be a couple of reasons for soggy rosettes. The batter could be thick which in that case, you can dilute it with some water (add one teaspoon at a time). If the rosette cookies are soggy, simply place them on a baking sheet and place them in a 350F oven for 5-10 minutes until they’re crisp again. 

How long do rosettes keep? 

Cover rosettes lightly in a container and they’ll keep for two days. To serve, you can reheat them in the oven if you like. 

Why are my rosettes sticking to the iron?

Make sure the iron is hot enough and that you’ve shaken off the excess oil before submerging the iron into the batter. Also, pay attention not to have batter on top of the iron. 

Can I freeze rosette cookies? 

Since these cookies are crisp and deep fried, they’re best when served immediately. Freezing them may result in soggy cookies. 

an panjereh - Persian rosettes is a traditional Persian cookie that is crisp and light. It's made of basic ingredients and once you find the technique, it is easy and fun to make!

Rosettes for Nowruz

I am so in love with the last days of winter, when nature starts to wake up slowly and trees start having beautiful blossoms. Green leaves can be seen everywhere and the weather starts getting warmer. That means spring is coming and for us Iranians, that means Nowruz will be here very soon! 

As many of you know, we celebrate the first day of spring as the start of a new year. We are getting ready for the new year by doing the spring cleaning, growing “sabzeh” or sprouts, baking Nowruz cookies and many other interesting things!

Did you make this recipe? I’d love to hear about it! Please comment and leave a 5-star🌟 rating below. You can also follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest or subscribe to our newsletter to get a free e-Cookbook!

4.96 from 23 votes

Nan Panjereh – Persian Rosettes

Nan Panjereh – Persian Rosettes is a traditional Persian cookie that is crisp and light. Once you find the technique, it is easy and fun to make!
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 40 minutes
Total: 50 minutes
Servings: 30 cookies
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Ingredients 

  • 1/3 cup wheat starch
  • 4 tbsp rose water
  • 3 eggs
  • 2/3 cup all purpose flour
  • vegetable oil , for frying

Instructions 

  • Mix the wheat starch and rose water in a bowl until forms a paste.
  • Add the eggs and beat using a whisk until fully combined.
  • Add the all purpose flour and mix until smooth. Let the batter sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  • Fill 1/3 of a saucepan with vegetable oil. Heat the oil until bubbles form around a toothpick touching the bottom of the pan.
  • Heat rosette iron by letting it stay in hot oil for 10-15 seconds.
  • Lift the iron, shake off the excess oil and immediately dip it into batter just that the edge of the iron is even with the surface of the batter. Then dip the iron into hot oil. Let the rosettes puff and then take the iron out of oil.
  • Fry each side of cookies for 30 seconds until golden. Take the cookie out and place it on a paper towel.
  • Repeat with the remaining batter until all the batter is used.
  • Dust some powdered sugar on top of cookies before serving.

Video

Notes

  • Check out this video to see how to make Persian rosettes. 
  • Stir the batter every 5-6 minutes in order to make sure it’s smooth. 
  • There could be a couple of reasons for soggy rosettes. The batter could be thick which in that case, you can dilute it with some water (add one teaspoon at a time). If the rosette cookies are soggy, simply place them on a baking sheet and place them in a 350F oven for 5-10 minutes until they’re crisp again. 
  • Storage: Keep the rosettes in a container in a cool and dry place and they’ll keep for 2 days.
  • To avoid the batter sticking to the iron, make sure the iron is hot enough and that you’ve shaken off the excess oil before submerging the iron into the batter. Also, pay attention not to have batter on top of the iron. 

Nutrition

Serving: 4g | Calories: 17kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 0.4g | Saturated Fat: 0.1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.2g | Trans Fat: 0.002g | Cholesterol: 16mg | Sodium: 6mg | Potassium: 8mg | Fiber: 0.1g | Sugar: 0.02g | Vitamin A: 24IU | Calcium: 3mg | Iron: 0.1mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

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About Shadi HasanzadeNemati

I'm here to show you how to make delicious Persian, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food at home. My easy to follow recipes will bring exciting new flavors to your table!

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56 Comments

  1. Do you think it’s possible to make this Gluten free without too much difficulty? I’m thinking GF AP flour and either a corn starch or a potato starch as substitutes. Thanks! Excited to try!

    1. Hi Rebecca, I have not tried these GF myself, so I cannot answer 100% but I think if you use a 1:1 GF flour and corn starch, it would work. Enjoy!

      1. 4 stars
        For anyone who’s curious – these came out really well gluten free. I replaced the wheat starch with corn starch and used Bob Red Mill’s gluten free all-purpose flour for the AP flour (with about 1/4 tsp of xantham gum). Thank you for a great recipe!

  2. 5 stars
    My mom used to make rosettes every Christmas! Your recipe is perfect and I love the addition of rose water!!

    1. Wheat Starch is a starch you can find in Asian supermarkets or online. It’s not a paste, it’s not flour, it’s like corn starch, but made from wheat.
      AP flour is All Purpose flour, like, normal flour that we use daily 🙂